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our product code stories 

We not only make simple, effective products that support hard work and adventuring spirit, we celebrate that spirit, too. So every Fieldworks product carries a product code number that honors:

  • places discovered
  • structures built
  • and other amazing feats of men.

Here are a few of the stories that inspired us:

 

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Commemorating the year the Works Progress Administration was established, putting tens of thousands of Depression-era Americans back to work. 

Learn more about Good Clean Mud, Product No. 1935

Learn more about the great construction projects we have to thank them for.

 

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In honor of the “Forty-Niners,” thousands of whom converged upon the California gold fields seeking their fortune through tough, back-breaking work. 
 

Learn more about Work Horse Muscle Balm, Product No. 1849

Learn more about the back-breaking work of the "Forty-Niners." 

 
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The year Yellowstone became our first National Park. In the 1930s, workers fought fires, reforested, built campgrounds and laid 1,100 miles of trails. And generations have enjoyed the fruits of their labor ever since. 

Feet of Endurance Protective Foot Balm, Product No. 1872

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Construction of the Hoover Dam  took the labor of 21,000 men. Today it remains a potent symbol of the rugged, indefatigable spirit of the American worker.

Learn more about Weather-Ready Hand Repair, Product No. 1930

Learn more about the harrowing construction of the Hoover Dam.

 

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When Sir Ernest Shackleton's ship capsized in the Antarctic ice in 1917, he and his men spent a year stranded on the Antarctic ice. In the end, he delivered his men home safely. He's been a legend ever since.

Learn more about Another Close Shave Gel, Product No. 1917

Learn more about the kind of leadership it took to get his men home from a year trapped on the Antarctic ice.

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In 1953 Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzig Norgay became the first people to summit Mt. Everest, effectively closing a chapter of world exploration when they conquered the earth's highest summit. Since then, another 3,142 (and counting) have followed in their footsteps. Because they could.

Razor's Edge Shave and Face Soap, Product No. 1953

 

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face-of-danger-1929.jpg

The first flight across the South Pole in 1929 would have been plenty enough adventure for most men. But not for Admiral Richard E. Byrd. He was also the first to fly across the North Pole, and he led four more polar expeditions. His exploits earned him more than 20 citations and special commendations--nine for bravery and two for extraordinary heroism. 

Face of Danger After-Shave Elixir, Product No. 1929

 

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In 1677, explorer Louis Hennepin became the first person to chronicle the majesty of Niagara Falls for European audiences. And thus sparked the beginning of our love affair with one of the world's most magnificent waterfalls.

Hose Off Body Wash, Product No. 1677

 

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At 1,046 feet, the Chrysler Building in New York is the tallest brick building in the world--a record set in 1930 when it was completed, and still held to this day. Just as impressive: every one of its 3.8 million bricks was laid by hand.

Learn more about Bar None Body Brick, Product No. 1046

Learn more about what it took to construct the tallest brick building in the world.